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September 25, 2018


So, you’re getting married! You’ve picked the perfect spot, with a picturesque wedding venue a stone’s throw from Glasgow in the heart of Scotland’s lowlands. But now you’re wondering how to incorporate tradition with your more subtle tastes…

Well, we’ve done the legwork for you and we can reassure you that having a traditional Scottish wedding doesn’t mean you need a bagpipe rendition of the wedding march or a deep love of all things tartan.

Read on to see five simple but stunning ways you can give a subtle nod to traditional Scottish symbolism on your big day!

Slip a Sixpence in Your Shoe

This one solely applies to the bride. The father-of-the-bride should place a silver sixpence in his daughter’s left shoe, to bring her luck and prosperity on her big day and beyond. You may have heard of this tradition as part of the ‘Something old, something new…’ adage, but the silver sixpence is a popular custom with many Scots’ brides – and an opportunity for a touching father-daughter moment before they get lost in the day’s events.

Bring Meaning to Your Bouquet and Buttonholes

Sweet white heather and the luck it is said to bring to a happy couple on their wedding day is deeply rooted in folklore. It can also be an attractive, understated way of incorporating native wildflowers into floral displays.

Of course, if you would rather feature a pop of colour on your tables or in your bouquet, you can always opt for purple heather and ornamental blue thistles (Eryngium), but make sure the bride has a sprig of white heather in her posy and the groom has a sprig in his boutonniere for good luck!

Try a Luckenbooth Brooch

If you’re after a bit of Scottish romance, this is just the ticket. The Luckenbooth Brooch was particularly popular in the 17th and 18th centuries; it was a love token given by a man to his lady to symbolise their betrothal.

The single or entwined hearts signified love while the crown on top symbolised loyalty. Used as a good luck charm, initially for the couple leading up to and on their wedding day, but also as a good luck charm for their first-born’s blanket – the luckenbooth brooch is a charming tradition, full of sentiment and subtle enough to be pinned to a bride’s gown or bouquet.

Treat Guests to a Traditional Tipple

If you want to add a tasty Scottish twist to your wedding, why not trade the usual champagne toast for a whisky one instead? You’re spoiled for choice when it comes to good whisky here, and your guests are bound to appreciate the change.

Of course, you could incorporate some traditional treats into your favours instead; miniature bottles of a local whisky and a bag of mini shortbread bites will put smiles on all your guests’ faces!

Let Robert Burns Do the Talking

Take away some of the pressure that comes with writing wedding speeches, and use the brilliant words of Scotland’s most beloved artists. One great example, and arguably one of the most widely known romantic poems, is Robert Burns’ ‘A Red, Red Rose’.

A sweet song about his love, filled with beautiful imagery and strong emotion, this is a classic that encapsulates real romance. Of course, you will want to keep all of your personal touches, inside jokes and anecdotes. But grooms – why not bowl over your own bonnie lass with the added help of Burns’ beautiful poem?

Of course, there are lots of ways to incorporate Scottish tradition into your wedding day. You may choose to go all-out with familial tartan kilts, or keep things a little more subtle and simply embrace the natural beauty provided by the picture-perfect setting of Gleddoch. However you choose to enjoy your wedding day, our team will be on hand to help. So, don’t be shy – get in touch if you have any questions about bringing your dream day to life!

Gleddoch is an independently owned hotel resort, beautifully located overlooking the Clyde Estuary. Gleddoch boasts 75 bedrooms, an 18 hole championship golf course an elegant banqueting room and a luxury Imperia Spa.

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